Sustainable Development Goal #17: Partnerships: Why They Matter

PARTNERSHIPS: WHY THEY MATTER What’s the goal here? To revitalize the global partnership for sustainable development Why? In 2015, world leaders adopted the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development that aims to end poverty, tackle inequalities and combat climate change. We need everyone to come together—governments, civil society, scientists, academia and the private sector— to achieve the sustainable development goals. Why does this matter to me? We are all in this together. The Agenda, with its 17 Sustainable Development Goals, is universal and calls for action by all countries, both developed countries and develop ing countries, to ensure no one is left behind. As partners, what would we need to do to achieve the Agenda? We will need to mobilize both existing and additional resources—technology development, financial resources, capacity building— and developed countries will need to fulfill their official development assistance commitments. Multistakeholder partnerships will be crucial to leverage the inter-linkages between the Sustainable Development Goals to enhance their effectiveness and impact and accelerate progress in achieving the Goals. How can we ensure the resources needed are effectively mobilized and monitored? This will be primarily the responsibility of countries. Reviews of progress will need to be undertaken regularly in each country, involving civil society, business and representatives of various interest groups. At the regional level, countries will share experiences and tackle common issues, while on an annual basis, at the United Nations, the High-Level Political Forum on Sustainable Development (HLPF), they will take stock of progress at the global level, identifying gaps and emerging issues, and recommending corrective action.

1st degree connections


Millenium Development Goals/UN and Sustainable Development Goals/UN as Instruments for Realising Sustainable Development Concept in the Global Economy
Comparative Economic Research 2017 (https://doi.org/10.1515/cer-2017-0006)
This article presents the results of analysis and evaluation of the main effects of the implementation of the eight UN Millennium Development Goals, in force until 2015, and to demonstrate differences between and prospects for implementation of the n...

1st degree connections


Non-bank financial institutions and economic growth: Evidence from Africa’s three largest economies
South African Journal of Economic and Management Sciences 2017 (https://doi.org/10.4102/sajems.v20i1.1545)
Background: In order for the post-2015 world development agenda – termed the sustainable development goals (SDGs) – to succeed, there is a pronounced need to ensure that available resources are used more effectively and additional financing is access...

4th degree connections


The European Union and UN Millennium Development Goals in Nigeria: A Study of the Micro Projects Programmes (MPPs) in the Niger Delta Region
Africa’s Public Service Delivery and Performance Review (APSDPR) 2016 (https://doi.org/10.4102/apsdpr.v4i3.124)
The present Cotonou Accord was signed by the EU, 77, African Caribbean and Pacific (ACP) countries towards halving poverty as prescribed by the UN Declaration by 2015. The EU's interventionin the rural communities of the oil producing states of Niger...

4th degree connections


Awareness, Knowledge, Proficiency, Training and Expertise of Public Elementary School Teachers in Tacloban City on Education for Sustainable Development
Journal of Education and Learning 2017 (https://doi.org/10.11591/edulearn.v11i2.6241)

Education for Sustainable Development is a thrust pursued by the United Nations to ensure that future generations are protected from key issues that tend to heighten the deterioration of the present society and environment. Using the descriptive s...


1st degree connections


Labonté Identifies Key Issues for Health Promoters in the New World Order; Comment on “Health Promotion in an Age of Normative Equity and Rampant Inequality”
International Journal of Health Policy and Management 2017 (https://doi.org/10.15171/ijhpm.2016.144)
For over 35 years Ronald Labonté has been critically analyzing the state of health promotion in Canada and the world. In 1981, he identified the shortcomings of the groundbreaking Lalonde Report by warning of the seductive appeal of so-called lifesty...

1st degree connections


Sustainable Urbanization and Development Goals Strategy through Public–Private Partnerships in a South-Asian Metropolis
Sustainability 2017 (https://doi.org/10.3390/su9111940)
Contemporary urbanization appears as a conundrum especially in developing nations. This study will act as an accelerator to spill out snags caused by urbanization with a new approach in the development of sustainable infrastructure through Public–Pri...

Evaluation of LEED for Neighbourhood Development and Envision Rating Frameworks for Their Implementation in Poorer Countries
Sustainability 2018 (https://doi.org/10.3390/su10020492)
The unstoppable world population growth is increasing the concentration of people in urban settlements and the number of megacities, especially in developing countries where urbanization exacerbates social and economic inequalities. Green rating syst...

Measuring Baseline Agriculture-Related Sustainable Development Goals Index for Southern Africa
Sustainability 2018 (https://doi.org/10.3390/su10030849)
Sustainable development has become the main focus of the global development agenda as presented in the 2015 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). However, for countries to assess progress, they need to have reliable baseline indicators. Therefore, th...

3rd degree connections


A Global Perspective on the Sustainable Performance of Urbanization
Sustainability 2016 (https://doi.org/10.3390/su8080783)
Urbanization, particularly in developing countries, is a major strategy for development. However, major concerns accompany it, such as air pollution, habitat destruction, and loss of arable land. In responding to these challenges, governments through...