Alexander Dhoest · Lukasz Szulc
Social media not only create new opportunities but also pose new challenges for the ways people navigate their online selves. As noted by boyd, social media are characterized by unique dynamics such as collapsed contexts, implying that one’s distinct offline social worlds meet online. This creates particular challenges for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) people, at least those who find it crucial to maintain distinct contexts in which they disclose or conceal their gender and/or sexual selves. However, the existing scholarship on social media use by LGBTQs is predominantly anchored in English-language Western contexts and tends to lose sight of the cultural specificities of Internet use. Therefore, in this article, we build on the scholarship to further investigate the role of context for disclosing or concealing gender and/or sexual selves online. More specifically, we ask, “How do social, cultural, and material contexts affect the ways LGBTQs navigate their selves on social media?” To investigate this question, we analyze in-depth face-to-face interviews with gay men who themselves, or whose parents, migrated to Belgium. Because their migration background forces them to negotiate different social, cultural, and material contexts, our focus on diasporic gay men helps to bring out the issue of context in social media use.

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HOMOSOSIALITAS DI PONDOK PESANTREN: STUDI KASUS DI PONDOK PESANTREN AS-SAKAN
Humanika 2016 (https://doi.org/10.14710/humanika.v23i2.13641)
This paper discusses the homosexual practices among students at Pondok Pesantren As-Sakan. By using queer and homosociality theory, the paper will show that human sexuality is a very complex continuum, in which homosexual practices can be manifested ...

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Permissive Attitude toward LGBT in Jakarta: Study of Differences in the Level of Permissiveness among individuals born in 1950-1970’s and 1980-2000’s
SHS Web of Conferences 2017 (https://doi.org/10.1051/shsconf/20173300057)
Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) movement is strongly resisted in Indonesia. This is not only that Indonesian people are still religious, but also the traditional norms and values are still very strong in daily life. Based on the Pew Res...

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LESBIAN, GAY, BISEXUAL, TRANSGENDER AGEING AND CARE: A LITERATURE STUDY
Social Work/Maatskaplike Werk 2016 (https://doi.org/10.15270/52-2-504)
There is an increasing body of research on ageing and end-of-life care (EOLC) of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) older people in the UK, USA and Australia. In contrast, in South Africa, despite progressive legislation to protect LGBT ri...

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Gender and Eroticism in Contemporary Art from South Africa
Werkwinkel: Journal of Low Countries and South African Studies 2017 (https://doi.org/10.1515/werk-2017-0006)
The aim of this article is to present the interaction between the history of lesbian and gay culture and its identity on the one hand, and the connection between the visual art or visual culture on the other hand. This essay endeavors to interpret th...

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"Something Unspeakable": James Baldwin and the "Closeted-ness" of American Power
James Baldwin Review 2017 (https://doi.org/10.7227/JBR3.4)
This article reads the work of James Baldwin in dialogue with that of Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick. Taking its cue from Baldwin’s claim that Americans “live […] with something in [their] closet” that they “pretend […] is not there,” it explores his depictio...

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Face-ism and Objectification in Mainstream and LGBT Magazines.
PLoS ONE 2016 (https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0153592)
In visual media, men are often shown with more facial prominence than women, a manifestation of sexism that has been labeled face-ism. The present research extended the study of facial prominence and gender representation in media to include magazine...

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“I feel like I am surviving the health care system”: understanding LGBTQ health in Nova Scotia, Canada
BMC Public Health 2016 (https://doi.org/10.1186/s12889-016-3675-8)
Abstract Background Currently, there is a dearth of baseline data on the health of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) populations in the province of Nova Scotia, Canada. Historically, LGBTQ health research has tended to focus on i...

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Should CAH in females be classified as DSD?
Frontiers in Pediatrics 2016 (https://doi.org/10.3389/fped.2016.00048)
Great controversies and misunderstandings have developed around the relatively recently coined term disorders of sex development or DSD. In this article we question the wisdom of including XX individuals with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) in t...

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